Growing Knowledge

Read the latest insights from our experts as they cover agronomy issues that matter most to you and your operation.

A Winning Option for Spring Wheat

Mark Torno
CROPLAN® Diverse Field Crops Marketing Manager
Reliability and stability are key ingredients for wheat seed, particularly if it is grown on variable soils. And having two varieties in one bag — pairing one that has a particular strength with another that has a completely different but complementary one — can help.
 
A WinPak® spring wheat variety from CROPLAN® seed offers a unique combination of two varieties that provides an exceptional level of stability throughout the field. WinPak varieties work together to increase yield potential by reducing risk from field variability, weather and soil conditions, and disease complexes. If you’re looking for a wheat seed option that performs well in variable conditions and under environmental pressures, here are some reasons to consider planting a WinPak variety.
 
Stability
There’s the value that comes with achieving the highest yield, and then there’s the value that comes with reliability and consistency. That’s where a WinPak wheat variety proves itself: We combine two products that work together to increase yield potential on tough acres while maintaining yield in higher-producing areas. Data has shown a synergistic effect that comes from having two types of seed in the bag. When one variety may not be at the top of the list in certain aspects, the other variety can compensate.
 
More genetics
No farmer gets excited about cleaning out the seeder and switching between varieties. Even though a farmer might want more genetics on the farm, it’s a lot of work that takes up valuable time. A WinPak variety provides two genetic backgrounds, and farmers only have to plant once.
 
Standability
If one seed component in a WinPak variety has a stronger standability rating than the other, it tends to bolster the second one. This nets out better than separately growing a variety with a less-desirable standability rating and another with a strong rating.
 
The power of two
CROPLAN currently offers one spring wheat WinPak variety, CP3888, which is a combination of CP3616 and CP3504. This WinPak variety has a number of features and benefits, including:
  • Excellent yield potential, strong protein
  • Strong disease package, great candidate for fungicide applications at flag leaf and heading
  • High response-to-nitrogen rating for peak protein advantage
 
For more information on WinPak varieties from CROPLAN seed and new varieties that are in the works, talk with your local trusted advisor.

Season 15, Episode 2: Digging Into Nutrient Deficiencies in Alfalfa and Soybeans

Joel and Jon
Hosts, WinField United
Hosts Joel Wipperfurth and Jon Zuk expand on the nutrient deficiency conversation on this episode of The Deal With Yield. Jon gives a look into 2018 soybean yields and the common nutrient deficiencies seen in fields across Minnesota. Joel talks alfalfa and the decision-making that goes along with managing his favorite crop.
 
Digging Into Nutrient Deficiencies in Alfalfa and Soybeans

The Deal With Yield is a podcast series covering the issues that matter most in crop production.
 

Joel and Jon
Hosts, WinField United
On this episode of the Deal With Yield, hosts Joel Wipperfurth and Jon Zuk discuss the various challenges impacting this year’s harvest, including compaction, common disease pressures like SDS and nutrient deficiency trends in corn. The guys look to answer the question, “Is there a connection between disease and fertility?”

The Deal With Yield is a podcast series covering the issues that matter most in crop production.

It’s Not Too Early to Talk Fungicides

Jason Roth
agronomist
Farmers often ask me when they should plan to purchase their fungicides for the season. My answer is, in the off-season AND in-season. It seems contradictory, but there are good reasons to make purchases both times of the year.
 
It’s not just about disease pressure
With tighter margins, many farmers are choosing to delay their fungicide purchases to see what the season brings. But that might not be the best approach to getting the most from your genetics. Our Answer Plot® data shows that not all hybrids respond to fungicide applications the same way. We’ve seen some locations where disease pressure has been relatively low, yet the hybrids respond significantly to a fungicide application. That’s because fungicides do more than just control disease. They affect plants in other physiological ways, including influencing nitrogen use efficiency, respiration maintenance and hormone production. All these things can affect yield potential, even in the absence of disease.
 
3 tips for a stronger plant health strategy
My advice for building a solid plant health strategy comes down to three steps.
 
  1. Review your seed choices and learn how they respond to a fungicide application. Plan to prepay for fungicides and adjuvants on acres with high-response hybrids. Our data shows a positive return on investment, even when disease pressure is low.
 
  1. For hybrids that are less responsive to fungicides, I’d recommend holding off on fungicide purchases to assess disease pressure in-season. If disease comes in early and is heavy, I’d recommend a fungicide, paired with MasterLock® adjuvant, to help protect yield potential.
 
  1. Regardless of when you make your purchase, you should always plan to add an adjuvant to your tank mix. The drift deposition aid MasterLock improves fungicide coverage within the plant’s canopy, leading to improved ROI potential on input costs. Our Answer Plot data has shown an average 5.7-bushel-per-acre yield advantage in corn, simply by adding MasterLock to the fungicide tank mix.
 
If you’re tempted to wait to make your fungicide purchases until next summer, take a look at your genetics’ response-to scores to make sure you’re not missing an opportunity to optimize yield. Postharvest is the perfect time to work with your local WinField United retailer to plan hybrid placement and management to ensure you’re capitalizing on your seed’s potential.    
 

Consider a Back to Basics Approach for Crop Fertility

Jason Haegele
Agronomist, WinField United
Chances are you have some routines and standard processes in place for managing your crop. You’re probably fertilizing, taking care of weeds and choosing the right hybrids for your acres. But, are you keeping plant physiology in mind when you make those decisions? It's not just about applying fertilizer, it’s also thinking about the timing, the rate and source of nutrients to ensure they’re available to the crop exactly when it needs it.
 
Plant nutrition 101
There are 17 nutrients that are required by all plants for survival. Each one promotes a different function in the plant and is derived from a different source, whether that is the air, water, soil minerals or a synthetic fertilizer. If you had the capability to completely remove any one of these nutrients from a crop, it would be unable to perform some function. For example, a plant grown completely without nitrogen would not produce chlorophyll and amino acids essential for proper growth. While it’s critical for plants to have an adequate supply of the essential nutrients for development, not all nutrients are needed in the same quantities and at the same time.
 
Time is of the essence
Agronomists use the term “elemental prominence” to describe the idea that there are certain nutrients that are more important than others at key points during the growth and development of a plant. We know that zinc, for example, is one nutrient that plants are most responsive to early in the growing season when the seed is germinating, emerging from the soil and establishing a young plant. Zinc is important for root growth and enzyme processes in the plant, so it makes sense to apply that nutrient early in the season rather than waiting until later to get the maximum benefit.
 
Putting these ideas into action
Understanding the inner workings of your crops can help you develop a more effective fertility program. Soil sampling prior to planting gives a baseline for determining nutrient levels so you can decide how and when you’ll supplement based on crop needs. Plant tissue sampling can give an indication of how efficiently the crop is using soil nutrients and can allow time for amendments in-season.
 
Much of the focus in the fall will be on phosphorus and potassium, and in certain geographies nitrogen. But there's also a great opportunity to focus on some of the other nutrients, such as sulfur and micronutrients, to provide a strong foundation for adequate plant uptake next year. Talk with your local agronomist to make the most of your crop fertility plans.

Displaying results 1-5 (of 28)
 |<  < 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6  >  >| 

Subscribe to the Advisor Newsletter

Sign up for monthly agronomic insights and product information.