Growing Knowledge

Read the latest insights from our experts as they cover agronomy issues that matter most to you and your operation.

Factoring Data Into Decision-Making

Kelsey Berger
Agriculture Technology Specialist
The new year is underway, so it’s time to dial up your planning for the coming growing season. With commodity prices demanding thorough preparation, data will be critical to ensuring you get the most out of every field in 2017. Take time now to evaluate how you’re using data to make decisions on your farm and determine how you can get more from the information available to you.
 
Here’s a look at how the Answer Plot® team uses data to power seed placement and help farmers place inputs precisely and effectively.
 
Determining seed placement through replication and localized conditions
A multitude of factors must be considered to place hybrids for optimum performance, including response to soil type, response to population, rotation and specific growing conditions. Because of the many factors that affect seed placement, quality data play a critical role in making decisions confidently. Through the Answer Plot® Program, we replicate hybrids and varieties at nearly 200 locations across the country in diverse soil types and growing conditions to determine how to best utilize each hybrid in a multitude of environments and cropping systems.
 
Recommendations for placement and management are backed by high-quality data that we’re able to maintain due to low trial error. Trial error represents factors we cannot see or anticipate that affect outcomes, which could include weather, disease, insect pressure, soil variability and other factors. The more replications, the smaller the margin of error.
 
Using data to inform input decisions
The WinField® United data analytics team is made up of 70 people who gather, analyze and organize data from the test plots then put the information into a useable form. For example, through the R7® Tool, response to nitrogen and fungicide scores are available for particular hybrids. These scores give you insights on how to prioritize your inputs based on the needs of specific hybrids in unique environments.
 
To learn more about incorporating different types of data into your decision-making process, contact your local WinField® United retailer.

Tech Tasks After Harvest: Part 2

Joel and Kyle
Hosts, WinField
Following up from last week’s episode of The Deal With Yield®, host Joel and guest Drew Garretson chat about updates in the ag technology industry. Tune in to hear how the size and capabilities of equipment are changing. Get their take on the importance of balancing trusted advisors relationships along with big data to best help farmers. Also listen to their response to an audience question about using technology to determine your best return on investment as crop prices decline.
 
For more information on new companies and updates in ag technology, visit answertech.com.
Season 7: Episode 5 – Tech Tasks After Harvest: Part 2

The Deal With Yield is a podcast series covering the issues that matter most in crop production.

Tech Tasks After Harvest: Part 1

Joel and Kyle
Hosts, WinField
On this week’s episode of The Deal With Yield®, host Joel Wipperfurth welcomes Drew Garretson, regional technology manager for WinField® United, to discuss the best ways to use ag technology after harvest. Now is a perfect time to evaluate which management practices were successful this past growing season based on in-season imagery and yield data, and how to improve next year. Also hear about the updated R7® Tool and how it has been re-engineered to be faster, more user-friendly and customizable. 
 
For more information about the R7® Tool updates, visit answertech.com
Season 7: Episode 4 – Tech Tasks After Harvest: Part 1

The Deal With Yield is a podcast series covering the issues that matter most in crop production. 

Manage Fall Nitrogen Responsibly

Jonathan Zuk
Regional Agronomist
Fall nutrient applications, particularly nitrogen, can help crops get off to the right start the following year. At the same time, targeted nutrient management is a goal shared across our industry, especially with nitrogen issues at the forefront of many conversations. It’s important to check field conditions and use technology to determine effective and responsible nitrogen management practices.
 
Stabilize nitrogen for sustainable, effective use
It is important to stabilize nitrogen in the fall to slow down its conversion into the mobile nitrate form. Un-stabilized nitrogen applications will expose the field to more risk, leaving winter precipitation and wet spring conditions to carry the nitrate nitrogen off target. Stabilizing nitrogen protects your investment as well as water quality.
 
The majority of nitrogen loss (around 70%) can occur below ground so adding protection to reduce leaching and loss from denitrification is important. Using N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizer with fall-applied anhydrous ammonia will make that nitrogen less susceptible to loss by keeping more of it available in the root zone during key corn growth stages.
 
Check field conditions for best nitrogen application timing 
There are several things you can easily evaluate to determine if fall nitrogen applications are appropriate for your acres.
  • Soil temperatures should cool to (and stay below) 50 degrees Fahrenheit as this is when soil bacteria activity is reduced.
  • Soil textures should be medium to loamy for optimal fall nitrogen applications. Sandy soils and coarse to medium topsoil with fractured limestone may allow fall-applied nitrogen to leach into water supplies, threatening groundwater quality.
  • Soil moisture that is moderate works best for ammonia application, but dry soils with medium or heavy texture that are in good physical condition can also work. Wet soils must be avoided due to poor sealing ability and potential of clodding.
 
Use tech to manage nitrogen responsibly
Using ag technology to optimize nitrogen applications can significantly increase potential return on investment and minimize the overall impact to the environment.
  • In-season imagery can help ensure you pinpoint the exact locations within a field where high yield environments exist. These images can be used to design a base layer fall nitrogen recommendation which can be followed by a precise in-season application to optimize high yield zones.
  • Models can aid you in monitoring in-season variables and making decisions on optimal rates. For example, you can see unfavorable weather in the forecast or look at response to nitrogen (RTN) scores on your hybrids and realize your hybrid might be hungry for nitrogen to drive an increase in bushels.
  • Tissue and soil samples can be paired with models and imagery to provide more insight into what the plant is enduring. Sampling can also be used to calibrate the model back to fit your farm and hybrid.
  • Variable rate technology can be used to apply nitrogen exactly where it needs to go. This can be beneficial for minimizing nitrogen waste and managing cost per bushel.
 
Contact your local WinField United retailer to determine the best nitrogen management options for your operation.

Manage Fall Nitrogen Precisely

Jonathan Zuk
Regional Agronomist
Fall nutrient applications, particularly nitrogen, can help crops get off to the right start the following year. At the same time, targeted nutrient management is a goal shared across our industry, especially with nitrogen issues at the forefront of many conversations. It’s important to check field conditions and use technology to determine effective and responsible nitrogen management practices.
 
Check field conditions for best nitrogen application timing  
There are several things you can easily evaluate to determine if fall nitrogen applications are appropriate for your acres.
  • Soil temperatures should cool to (and stay below) 50 degrees Fahrenheit as this is when soil bacteria will go dormant.
  • Soil textures should be medium to loamy for optimal fall nitrogen applications. Sandy soils and coarse to medium topsoil with fractured limestone may allow fall-applied nitrogen to leach into water supplies, threatening groundwater quality.
  • Soil moisture that is moderate works best for ammonia application, but dry soils with medium or heavy texture that are in good physical condition can also work. Wet soils must be avoided due to poor sealing ability and potential of clodding.
Stabilize nitrogen for effective use
It is important to stabilize nitrogen in the fall so that it does not convert into the mobile nitrate form. Un-stabilized nitrogen applications will expose the field to more risk, leaving late season fall rains or wet spring conditions to carry the nitrate nitrogen off target. Stabilizing nitrogen protects your investment as well as land and water quality.
 
Use tech to manage nitrogen responsibly
Using ag technology to optimize nitrogen applications can significantly increase potential return on investment and minimize the overall impact to the environment.
  • In-season imagery can help ensure you pinpoint the exact locations within a field where high yield environments exist. These images can be used to design a base layer fall nitrogen recommendation which can be followed by a precise in-season application to optimize high yield zones.
  • Models can aid you in monitoring in-season variables and making decisions on optimal rates. For example, you can see unfavorable weather in the forecast or look at response to nitrogen (RTN) scores on your hybrids and realize your hybrid might be hungry for nitrogen to drive an increase in bushels.
  • Tissue and soil samples can be paired with models and imagery to provide more insight into what the plant is enduring. Sampling can also be used to calibrate the model back to fit your farm and hybrid.
  • Variable rate technology can be used to apply nitrogen exactly where it needs to go. This can be beneficial for minimizing nitrogen waste and managing cost per bushel.
Contact your local WinField United retailer to determine the best nitrogen management options for your operation. 

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